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About TaL AM

About TaL AM

History

The TaL AM curriculum was developed by a dynamic team of writers and teachers in Montreal and Israel, led by Covenant Award recipient Tova Shimon.


Philosophy

The TaL AM program is based on the notion that the best learning environment for children is one in which knowledge is acquired through a variety of activities, using each of the five senses. In addition to studying from textbooks, students learn the Hebrew language through music, games and visual aids, developing a keen understanding of Jewish concepts and values.

 

The students’ Hebrew and heritage literacy develops in a gradual and spiraled process, building new ideas and concepts on an expanding foundation of knowledge. The program helps foster Jewish identity by allowing children to explore their Jewish roots and traditions in fun and exciting ways. By making the study of Hebrew and Judaism relevant to the children’s everyday lives, the program enables them to develop a true appreciation of their heritage, and understand the need for continued, lifelong Jewish study.

 

The goal of TaL AM is expressed in the acronym LYMUD (in Hebrew: learning):

 

Lefateach – to develop:

Our goal is to develop evolving learners through a gradual process, with a holistic and spiraled curriculum implemented by skilled, creative and sensitive educators.

 

Yeladim YehudiyimJewish children:

Developing the children’s Jewish identity. We aim to expand their knowledge of and commitment to:

 

Am (as in Am Israel) – Pride in being part of the Jewish People, understanding and accepting responsibility for Tikkun Olam, contributing to the improvement of life on earth.

 

Torah – Commitment to study, respect and transmit the entrusted sources from generation to generation.

 

Israel (as in Eretz Israel) – The land we came from and returned to. Recognizing the centrality of Israel in our lives.

 

Lashon (Language) – Hebrew is our people’s communication, identity and heritage language, and is essential to the authentic study of our sources. Education is learner-centered, focusing on the child and his/her interests and learning styles, by adjusting both content and methods of instruction.

 

MaskilimLiterate:

The acquisition of cognitive knowledge of our sources and the development of a Jewish learner.

 

U’Mesurim bechol (and) Committed:

Emphasizing the affective exploration of and identification with their Jewishness.

 

DrachehemTheir ways:

TaL AM actively involves all frames of mind in providing each learner with the skills needed to function as a Jew in his/her daily life, integrating and synthesizing Judaism in a meaningful way.


Methodology

TaL AM presents a Natural Approach to Hebrew Language Acquisition.

The program activates learning in all frames of mind by utilizing a wide range of activities for all modes of communication, integrating Hebrew Language acquisition, the development of Jewish concepts and values, and reading and writing skills.

In accordance with these principles, the program creates a visual and auditory Hebrew environment in the classroom which is mirrored in the students’ materials, thus extending their use into the home, enhancing retention and reinforcing the learning process.

The curriculum offers a variety of stories, Jewish sources, prayers and blessings, as well as age-appropriate songs, recitations and plays which aim to develop the child and his/her Jewish identity.

The program is structured around a Virtual Classroom comprised of diverse students, each demonstrating how s/he learns. These virtual students grow and develop together with the students, serving as models for the construction of a learning community.

Curriculum:

  • Concepts & values
  • Judaic sources
  • Children’s literature
  • Language skills
  • Thinking & learning skills
  • Planning
  • Integration
  • Connecting home & school
  • Considering contemporary influences
  • Connecting the grades

Learning:

  • Activating multiple intelligences
  • Developing learning & thinking skills
  • Communication skills:
  1. Listening comprehension
  2. Oral communication
  3. Reading & reading comprehension
  4. Functional & creative writing
  • Monitoring progress and evaluation

Hebrew:

  • Principles of heritage language development
  • Communication
  • Early childhood literature
  • Vocabulary
  • Language patterns
  • Grammar
  • Spelling

Heritage

  • Torah
  • Tefilah
  • Shabbat
  • Holidays
  • Mitzvot
  • Jewish laws and customs
  • Primary concepts & values
  • Sensitivity & respect for the versatile Jewish experience

Scope & Content

TaL AM 1 Scope and Composition

 

TaL AM 1 is organized along four inter-related tracks:

 

Shalom – 3 units

Daily life in class, at home and outdoors and the Grade 1 album.

 

Shalom: The first unit, Shalom baKita (in the classroom), focuses on the class, familiarizing the children with their fellow students, with the classroom environment and the objects it contains, with their daily routines and with the learning process. The second unit, Shalom baBait u’Vachutz (at home and outdoors) deals with the objects and daily routines in the home, connecting them to the Jewish way of life, and also with the world surrounding the children and the various weather phenomena existing in nature. The learning is conducted through activities and concrete experiences facilitated through the Hebrew environment in the classroom.

 

Shabbat Shalom – 4 units

Shabbat and the Parashat haShavua.

 

Parashat haShavua: Throughout the year the students develop the awareness of the act of reading a parasha in the synagogue and in class every week. They acquire the Torah blessings, and learn to identify the name of the parasha in its first verse. Each parasha is studied through two illustrations, which are the basis for the stories presented in simplified Hebrew in the teacher’s Big Book.

 

Holidays – 6 units

The High Holidays, Chanuka, Tu biShvat, Purim, Pesach to Shavuot, Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim.

 

The High Holidays: The children learn to identify the holiday’s symbols (the shofar, suka, four species etc.) and become familiar with the concepts central to the High Holidays: Teshuvah, Tefilah and Tzedakah. The unit also focuses on the observance of the holiday mitzvot in the classroom, at home and in the synagogue.

 

Chanuka: The unit focuses on two main themes: 1) The Jewish people’s struggle to preserve their identity, manifested in the battle between the Greek culture and the Jewish way of life. 2) The mitzvot and customs of Chanuka commemorate the triumph of the few over the many, and the miracle of lights, enabling the purification of Beit haMikdash. The content and language of the Chanuka story reverberate and emphasize its central concept: We are committed to being Jewish! The re-enactment of the story in song and prayer and the practice of the holiday’s mitzvot and customs offer a practical means of developing Jewish identity and creating a bond with Israel.

 

Tu biShvat: The children learn to identify the various parts of the tree and its value to us and to the animals. The unit compares Rosh haShana – man’s New Year, and Tu biShvat – the trees’ New Year. The students are taught which of the fruits growing in Eretz Israel compose the Seven Species, and which mitzvot and customs are observed on Tu biShvat.

 

Purim: The children learn the proverb “Mi sheNichnas Adar Marbim beSimcha” and its meaning, as well as the story of the holiday, represented by the four main characters appearing in the Megila. The students also learn about the mitzvot and customs we perform during Purim (reading the Megila, Mishloach Manot, special Purim tzedaka, the Purim feast, Al haNisim) and the concept veNahafoch Hu, central to the unit.

 

Pesach: Pesach is presented through the four names of the holiday, emphasizing the origins and significance of each name. The Big Book explains these four names and their manifestations in the story of the holiday and in the customs and mitzvot. The unit teaches the children how to practice the preparation of the classroom and home for the Seder, while the accompanying library books expose them to the experience of Biur Chametz and prepare them to ask the Ma Nishtana and to follow and participate in the Seder.

 

Shavuot: The Shavuot unit is linked to the Pesach unit through the counting of the Omer, emphasizing the waiting period between Pesach and Shavuot – Chag Matan Torah. The learning focuses mainly on Matan Torah and the continuity from the Israelites receiving the Torah on Mount Sinai to the students’ own Torah leaning in everyday life. The unit also introduces the holiday’s four names, emphasizing its various characteristics.

 

Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim: The children learn about our connection to Eretz Israel and Jerusalem. The identification with Am Israel on Yom haAtzmaut is acquired and internalized through the day’s celebration; through the country’s symbols: the flag, the symbol and the anthem; and through the prayer for the safety of Israel – common to the students and all of Am Israel. The children also learn about the connection each and every Jew has with Jerusalem – The Holy City and the capital of Israel.

 

Ariot Kore veKotev – 5 units

Development of Hebrew reading, writing and language skills.

 

Through these 4 thematic tracks, the students learn and experience concepts, values, children’s literature, prayers, blessings and laws and customs in Hebrew, and develop Hebrew literacy and language skills.

 

TaL AM 1 offers all the Jewish Studies materials for a complete school year:

 

For the Classroom:

  • Interactive Posters – for prayers, blessings and a complete Hebrew environment
  • CDs – songs, stories and dictations to develop listening and comprehension skills.
  • Graded Library – age-relevant stories for literacy development.
  • Big Books – include themes stories, library books, songs and plays.
  • Games – for acquisition, reinforcement and enrichment of content and skills.
  • PDF of the TaL AM materials: workbooks, big books and library books
  • Ariot CAL an internet program.

 

For Students – Workbooks for learning and experiencing.

 

For Teachers – Practical manuals and assessment tools.

 

For Parents – Background materials, weekly updates and special events.



TaL AM 2 Scope and Composition

 

TaL AM 2 is organized in three inter-related tracks:

 

Shay – Shana Yehudit – The Jewish year –

 

Tov baKita u-vaBayit – Daily life in the class, at home and outdoors – 1 unit.

 

Tov baKita u-vaBayit: In Tov baKita the children become familiar with their fellow students, and deepen their acquaintance with the students of the Virtual Class by learning their first and last names. The children welcome two new students to their class: Yehuda, who arrived from Israel, and Nurit, who did not previously study in a Jewish school. The content of this unit is based on the activation of knowledge acquired in Grade 1, and develops independent learners able to assess what they have learned. Memory activation and learning for retention are emphasized as life skills through the utilization of the Keepsake Notebook. Tov baBayit focuses on the daily routines of the home concerning clothing, cleanliness and proper nutrition, while instilling the mitzvot and customs corresponding to them.

 

Shabbat Sheli veShelanu – 1 unit.

 

Holidays – 6 units

The High Holidays, Chanuka, Tu biShvat, Purim, Pesach to Shavuot, Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim.

 

The High Holidays: This unit focuses on the preparations for Rosh haShana during the month of Elul. The students also learn the Biblical sources of the main mitzvot of the High Holidays, the historical background of Sukot, and the connection between the four species and the understanding of the environment in Judaism.

 

Chanuka: This unit builds the Chanuka story through songs, picture interpretation and a variety of other activities. The guided reader expounds on the two miracles and relates the Talmudic source of the holiday, while Yehuda haGadol veYehuda haKatan encourages the children’s emotional involvement in the events. The students expand their study of the holiday’s mitzvot and customs, play riddle games, and write about the miracles of Chanuka in their Keepsake Notebook.

 

Tu biShvat: The children learn about different kinds of trees through the Biblical context of the creation of the world, in which God created trees of all kinds. The unit also focuses on the blessings we say on the various fruits and their products, and on the Seven Species and their natural habitat in Israel. Through the almond tree the students learn how the festival is celebrated in Israel. While studying the unit the children prepare a project on a tree of their choice.

 

Purim: The children review key concepts studied in grade 1 and expand their study of the Megila, focusing on the main protagonists and the emotions they experience throughout the story (joy, anger, fear, hatred, sadness). The unit emphasizes the concept veNahafoch Hu by examining the various opposites existing in the Megila and implementing the concept in classroom activities. The children review the mitzvot and customs of the holiday, identifying the letter common to all of them, and summarize the knowledge they have amassed in their Keepsake Notebook.

 

Pesach: This unit focuses on “beChol Dor vaDor”: each generation must feel as though they themselves took part in the Exodus from Egypt. The unit addresses the story of the Exodus within the framework of a simulation play – Avadim Hayinu – through which the children re-enact this monumental event, identifying with our forefathers, and feeling as though they themselves participated in the Exodus. In addition, the children receive a Hagada which builds on knowledge acquired in grade 1, teaching them how to create a model Seder, and discussing the behavior that enabled the preservation of the Israelites’ identity, and hence their redemption.

 

Shavuot: The unit builds on the knowledge acquired in grade 1, expounding on each of the holiday’s names: Chag haShavuot – concluding the counting of the Omer; Chag haKazir – emphasizing the holiday’s agricultural aspect; Chag haBikurim – linking to the Three Pilgrimage Festivals; and Chag Matan Torah – in which the students experience standing at Mount Sinai as though they themselves were in attendance, implementing receiving the Torah in their lives through Torah learning and keeping mitzvot.

 

Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim: The children expand their study of Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim, the flag, the anthem and the symbols. The history of Eretz Israel and Am Israel is experienced through the story of the land throughout the ages as told by the map of Israel and Am Israel. Using focus questions, the students learn to identify key events, where the People of Israel were at the time, and how the land and the people felt during each of the events. The students’ connection to Jerusalem is intensified through a comparison between the city as it once was and how it is today, and through the writing of prayers – “haTfila Sheli baKotel.”

 

The Keepsake Notebook – 1 unit.

 

Parashat haShavua ve-haTfila Sheli veShelanu – 4 units.

 

Parashat haShavua: The students learn the content of the parashot through 8 illustrations, furthering their study by listening to the first verse of the parasha, containing its title, as well as selected key verses. They acquire the content of each parasha through riddles and Torah games, linking it to their everyday lives. The children learn to express the message of the parasha as a Dvar Torah they can share with their families at home

 

haTorah Sheli veShelanu – 4 units Bereshit, No’ach, Lech Lecha, vaYera.

 

TaL AM 2 is organized in three discipline-based tracks, aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking and language skills. The brain-based design of the material and the congruence and alignment of its content and skills contribute to the acceleration of the learning process.

 

TaL AM 2 is comprised of the following materials:

 

For Students – Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery, creativity and summative assessment.

 

For Teachers – User-friendly manuals, a planner, formative, summative evaluation tools for content and skills, as well as PDF of the TaL AM materials: workbooks, guided readers and library books.

 

For the Classroom– Interactive posters, flashcards, games, guided readers, library books and audio CDs

.

For Parents – An overview of the content and skills in the curriculum, and information letters updating parents of materials and learning experiences.

 

For the school – Keepsake Notebook – a tool documenting the students’ learning and achievements in content and communication skills (reading, writing and speaking). The album will assist administrators and teachers in planning memory activation and continuing to develop the students’ knowledge and abilities in a deliberate, coordinated and inter-connected way from year to year. In addition, TaL AM 2 offers a Curriculum Implementation Report intended to facilitate communication among teachers from year to year.


 


TaL AM 3 Scope and Composition

 

TaL AM 3 is organized in three discipline-based and aligned tracks:

 

Shay – Shana Yehudit – The Jewish year –

 

Daily life – beHazlacha Etzlenu baKita – 1 unit.

 

beHatzlacha Etzlenu baKita: This unit concentrates on four main themes: (1) The Memory Box, which helps students recollect what they learned in the past, and retain new knowledge acquired throughout the school year; (2) The rules for successful learning; (3) The concept of Multiple Intelligences, which enable us to think, learn and perform other activities successfully; (4) A deeper acquaintance with the students of the Virtual Class – their distinct characteristics, hobbies etc. – as a model for their own class. The children are also introduced to Ronen, a new student, and experience through him the process of integration and the significance of friendship and acceptance.

 

Shabbat – Shabbat Mevarchim – 1 unit.

 

Holidays – 6 units

The High Holidays, Chanuka, Tu biShvat, Purim, Pesach to Shavuot, Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim.

 

The High Holidays: The students expand their knowledge of the connection between the preparations for Yom Kippur during Aseret Yemei Tshuva and Yom Kippur and its prayers. The students learn the meaning of the blessings said to family and friends during each holiday, and deepen their understanding of the link between the four species and Eretz Israel.

 

Chanuka: The unit opens with a song and the Memory Box, reminding students of all they have previously learned about the holiday. The guided reader utilizes divergent thinking to review knowledge the students have acquired about Chanuka, its symbols and customs, which serves as the foundation for learning new content. Keitzad Madlikim Nerot baChanuka presents the candle lighting custom according to Beit Hillel and Beit Shamai, while Bina Mechina Hafta’a laChanuka and Dan haBashlan instill the holiday customs in an experiential way.

 

Tu biShvat: The students study the various cycles existing in the world through the senses, with a special emphasis on the cycle of growth. Through the blessings and customs linked to each cycle, the students gain an understanding of how Judaism instructs us to treat the environment. They also learn how the date of the festival was set through the study of the dispute between Beit Hillel and Beit Shamai. The unit expands the study of the blessings applying to various plants, and teaches the children how to categorize these plants in different ways.

 

Purim: The unit opens with memory activation, by means of the Memory Box. The story of the Megila is studied through the medium of a play, employing various intelligences (speaking, reading and writing; emotion; thinking etc). The play focuses on central events as they appear in the language of the play and the language of the Megila, encouraging the students to trace the reasons for these events using divergent thinking. The students expand their study of the mitzvot and customs of Purim, while examining the special significance of each mitzvah and custom to Am Israel. In conclusion, the students write about their Purim activities in the classroom, at home and in the synagogue.

 

Pesach: The students expand their knowledge of the Exodus and of the holiday’s rituals and customs by conducting a model Seder. The Haggadah is studied through the concepts of avdut – slavery and herut – freedom, focusing on the transition from bondage to freedom undergone by Am Israel. Following the mitzvah to remember Yetziat Mitzrayim each and every day and throughout the ages, the unit encourages the children to reflect on what they already know and remember about the Exodus, and to appreciate the freedom they enjoy today.

 

Shavuot: The students deepen the knowledge they have acquired about the counting of the Omer by examining the Biblical text, understanding the feelings associated with the wait time required for crops to grow and for the reception of the Torah, and becoming familiar with the historical events which have taken place during the counting of the Omer. The students also learn how to fulfill the mitzvah of counting the Omer.

 

The study of Shavuot focuses on the Ten Commandments given at Mount Sinai, examined as tenets for the administration of a just and civilized society, and through their practical implications on the students’ lives.

 

Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim: The children’s memory is activated through key items retrieved from the Memory Box. The children “hike” through Israel while reading the guided book Kef Letayel beIsrael, studying unique and interesting things about various places around the country throughout history and today, and preparing a final project about a location of their choice. Special emphasis is given to the Declaration of Independence and to the statutes therein, enabling the successful construction of a state. These are linked to the rules for successful learning, studied in the unit beHazlacha.

 

Torah – 6 units

Chayei Sara, Toldot, vaYetze, vaYishlach, vaYeshev, miKetz, vaYechi.

 

Parashat haShavua and Tefilah – 5 units

Bereshit, Shmot, vaYikra, beMidbar, Dvarim.

 

Parashat haShavua: Each parasha features a symbol presented as a riddle; through the study of the parasha the students discover the link between this symbol and the parasha. Each parasha includes: a series of pictures reminding the students of its content of and illustrating its key words; a game focusing on key words and a central message; the preparation of a Dvar Torah using the symbol-riddle, placed for safekeeping in their Memory Box.

 

TaL AM 3 is organized in three discipline-based tracks, aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking and language skills. The brain-based design of the material and the congruence and alignment of its content and skills contribute to the acceleration of the learning process.

.

TaL AM 3 is comprised of the following materials:

 

For Students – Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery, creativity and summative assessment.

 

For Teachers – User-friendly manuals, a planner, formative and summative evaluation tools for content and skills, as well as PDF of the TaL AM materials: workbooks, guided readers and library books.

 

For the Classroom – Interactive posters, flashcards, games, library books for reading reinforcement and enrichment, CDs and CD-ROMs

.

For Parents – An overview of the content and skills of TaL AM 3, information letters updating parents of materials and learning experience.

 

For the school – The Memory Box – a tool documenting the students’ achievements in content and communication skills (reading, writing and speaking). The Memory Box will assist teachers and educational leadership in planning memory activation and continuing to develop the students’ knowledge and abilities in a deliberate, coordinated and inter-connected way from year to year. TaL AM 3 offers a Curriculum Implementation Report intended to facilitate communication among teachers from year to year.


 


TaL AM 4 Scope and Composition

 

TaL AM 4 is organized in five discipline-based and aligned tracks:

 

Shay – Shana Yehudit – The Jewish year:

 

haKita haMeuchedet: Daily life in class and at home – 1 unit.

 

haKita haMeuchedet: The unit focuses on the unique nature of each individual through questionnaires enabling the students to familiarize themselves with their friends’ special qualities and needs, and on building a unified society which is based on accepted rules of conduct, and which also makes room for the individual. In Grade 4 the students become acquainted with Keren, a new student who is wheelchair-bound, and learn how to accommodate people with special needs. The children link the rules of conduct to the Jewish way of life and to selected proverbs of our sages, and learn how to retain the material they learn by classifying it in their Memory Folder. The central learning skill in this unit is the identification of problems and the process of seeking counsel in order to arrive at a solution.

 

Holidays: – 6 units.

The High Holidays, Chanuka, Tu biShvat, Purim, Pesach to Shavuot, Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim.

 

The High Holidays: This unit links the mitzvot and customs of the High holidays to the Oral Law as well as the Torah. The unit focuses on two main themes: 1) The process of Teshuvah, studied through Maimonides’ Hilchot Teshuvah, their implementation in various situations, and their connection to the rules of proper behavior – not only during the High Holidays, but throughout the year. 2) The halachot for a kosher suka studied through the Suka Tractate of the Mishna, and the connection between the four species and the various characteristics of Am Israel.

 

Chanuka: The Memory Folder enables students to recall songs and stories previously learned about Chanuka, as well as the mitzvot and customs commemorating the Maccabees’ bravery and the miracles they experienced. The unit explores the question: what are the sources of the holiday? and aims at understanding the Chanuka story from the perspective of its heroes. The guided reader raises the problems the Jews faced and the solutions they chose, while implementing the skill of identifying and solving problems, central to the Grade 4 curriculum. This skill is also featured in the library books Ma Lamad Matityahu me-haTzipor haKtana and haBchira Shel Dan, which exemplify what we can learn from the Maccabees in order to preserve our Jewish identity – both in the present and the future.

 

Tu biShvat: The students focus on the in-depth study of the three Torah edicts pertaining to the environment: Le’ochla = how we enjoy the trees; Le’ovda = our responsibility to care for the trees and the environment; and Le’shomra = our responsibility to protect the environment for its future existence. The concept of the tree is expanded to Etz Chaim (the Torah) in order to create an analogy between the interrelation of man and nature, and man and the Torah. In conclusion the students prepare a Tu biShvat feast made of the fruits of Eretz Israel.

 

Purim: Through the Memory Folder the students review all that they have successfully learned and remembered about the story of the Megila. The joy of the holiday is presented to the children through jokes; 7 humorous project books enable the students to differentiate between positive and offensive humor. The Megila story focuses on the life skill of decision-making by presenting the story in a Problem-Advice-Solution format, and on the skill of inference, comparing what is explicitly written in the text with what can be construed reading between the lines. The students examine the mitzvot and customs through the concept veNahafoch Hu.

 

Pesach: This unit focuses on the concept of Pesach Mitzrayim – Pesach Dorot: how our forefathers celebrated their redemption during the time of the Exodus, and how we celebrate it today. This comparison is explored while studying the Hagada and enacted through a magical Hagada story in which the children are whisked back to Egypt, and are able to witness what their ancestors felt and endured, contrasting it with what they feel and experience today. The Exodus is also aligned and linked to the Torah track, as the children study the Exodus in Chumash Shmot.

 

Shavuot: During the period during which we count the Omer, symbolizing the anticipation of receiving the Torah and achieving spiritual liberation, the unit examines Rabbi Akiva, who overcame the difficult reality he was faced with and became a great scholar. Rabbi Akiva, and the basic rule he established – Love Thy Neighbor As Yourself – exemplify proper behavior facilitating the unity of the People of Israel.

The Shavuot unit focuses on elucidating the custom of Tikun Leil Shavuot through the examination of Torah verses and of the question “What do we fix?” through a simulation of how the students would have felt and acted prior to Matan Torah.

 

Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim: Through the Memory Folder the students review the components and symbols of a sovereign state (land, language, anthem, flag, symbol and army). They learn about the similarities between Israel’s Independence Day and other Jewish holidays, and about the origin of the holidays (Torah/Megila/Mishna/Gmara/Sidur). The children experience the special connection of Am Israel to Jerusalem and the centrality of Jerusalem to Am Israel and to the world through the guided reader Ma Mesaprot haAvanim Al Yerushalayim? and through a songbook. Each stone describes a specific period along the timeline, and each song adds the emotional aspect of our connection to the city.

 

Tefila & Parashat Hashavua:

HaTfila BaKita HaMeuchedet -Birkat HaMazon – 1 unit,

Parashat HaShavua BaKita HaMeuchedet: 5 units: Bereshit, Shmot, VaYikra, BeMidbar, Dvarim

 

Parashat haShavua: A series of illustrations recalls the content of each parasha. Its study focuses on selected verses, which raise a question. The students of the Virtual classroom and a variety of commentators offer answers to the question, thereby exposing the students to divergent thinking, implemented in Torah study. The activities in each unit encourage the students to select the commentary that best reflects their opinion, thereby participating in the tradition of interpretation. They learn a proverb linking the commentary and the message of the parasha, which they can apply in their own lives, presenting it to their families as a Dvar Torah.

 

Torah:

Sefer Shemot: 4 units

haAvdut beMitzrayim (Chapters 1-5), Eser haMakot (Chapters 6-11), Yetziat Mitzrayim (Chapters 12-17), Matan Torah (Chapters 18-24).

 

Torah sheBe’al Pe:

Mishna:

Pirkei Avot – 1 unit

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TaL AM 4 is organized in four discipline-based tracks, aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking and language skills. The brain-based design of the material and the congruence and alignment of its content and skills contribute to the acceleration of the learning process.

 

TaL AM 4 is comprised of the following materials:

 

For Students – Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery, and creativity, and formative and summative assessment.

For Teachers – User-friendly manuals, a planner, formative and summative evaluation tools for content and skills, as well as PDF of the TaL AM materials: workbooks, guided readers and library books.

 

For the Classroom – Interactive posters, flashcards, games, library books for reading reinforcement and enrichment, CDs and CD-ROMs.

 

For Parents – An overview of the content and skills of TaL AM 4, information letters updating parents of materials and learning experiences.

 

For the school – The Memory Folder – a tool documenting the students’ achievements in content and communication skills (reading, writing and speaking). The Memory Folder will assist teachers and educational leadership in planning memory activation and continuing to develop the students’ knowledge and abilities in a deliberate, coordinated and inter-connected way from year to year.

 

 


 


TaL AM 5 Scope and Composition

 

TaL AM 5 is organized in four discipline-based and aligned tracks:

 

Shay – Shana Yehudit – The Jewish Year

haKita haChoshevet ve-haPeila: Daily life in class and at home -1 unit.

 

haKita haChoshevet ve-haPeila: The unit deals with the construction of the social framework of a thinking, active class and the personal identity of each student in preparation for the end of elementary school, focusing on the names they have acquired and what they would like to be through a variety of stories and parables. In Grade 5 the students learn how to employ divergent thinking using Thinking Hats (Advantages, Disadvantages, Feelings, Thoughts etc.) which assist them in examining problems from various perspectives, and how to use Action Gloves (Creativity, Leadership, Assistance, Consideration etc.) in order to become active members of their class and of their community. The students thus develop the life skill of problem solving, linked to all content tracks.

 

Holidays: – 6 units

The High Holidays, Chanuka, Tu biShvat, Purim, Pesach to Shavuot, Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim.

 

The High Holidays: The students expand the study of the Hilchot Teshuvah (laws of repentance) set forth by the Rambam, and learn about the period Bein Kese leAsor and its significance in terms of Slicha, Teshuvah and renewal. In preparation for Yom Kipur the children learn the story of Yonah while developing the skill of reading between the lines, and examine interpretations offered by various commentators. The study of the holiday of Sukot focuses on the Ushpizin we invite to our sukah and on the important things we can learn from them. The students are encouraged to invite a guest of their own choosing to their suka, and write about him/her.

 

Chanuka: The students recall the important material they previously learned about Chanuka, and study the halachot associated with the chanukia and the candle lighting ritual. The unit focuses on identifying the miracle of Chanuka; the guided reader encourages the students to think about the protagonist’s actions while utilizing their Thinking Hats, and to monitor his thought process, leading to action. The library books focus on the mitzva of Pirsum haNes: in Ma Mesaprot haChanukiot? the children learn about different chanukiot and their underlying meaning, ultimately creating their own chanukia. Lama Asur Lehishtamesh baHem? focuses on the imperative “Ela Lir’otam Bilvad” and on its link to the miracles, while Hillel ve-haShe’ela haKasha explains why we continue to celebrate events that happened thousands of years ago, and how we preserve our Jewish identity in a non-Jewish world.

 

Tu biShvat: In Grade 5 the children conduct a Tu biShvat Seder, in which they learn which fruits we traditionally eat during the holiday, what they represent, and the order in which we say the blessings over the various species. The story of Choni haMe’agel teaches the students about the importance of man’s efforts for Kium haOlam – the preservation of the world. The edict Bal Tashchit from the Book of Deuteronomy is studied through commentaries of the sages and through library books, and the topic of recycling receives special attention. In conclusion, the students prepare an Environment and Society Fair, encouraging them to think about how they can act towards Tikun Olam and towards the conservation of our environment.

 

Purim: The guided book Eich Pa’alu Giborei haMegila veLama enables the students to focus on the protagonists of the Megila and their feelings, as well as the significant objects, places and actions therein. The unit includes a dramatization of the Megila as well, which appears in a guided book and animated DVD. The students expand their study of the concept veNahafoch Hu through a guided book and library books, finding opposites in their own everyday language. The unit also deals with the link between Haman and Amalek, with intolerance of the Other, and with the importance of acting against hatred.

 

Pesach: The Pesach unit focuses on the various types of slavery – physical, spiritual and national – as well as the various types of freedom. It also deals with the correlation between the slavery of the Israelites in Egypt and contemporary stories of slavery, told in the unit’s library books. The TaL AM Hagada links the texts, songs and prayers appearing in the Hagada (Ha Lachma Anya, Ma Nishtana, Ma’ase beRabbi Eliezer, etc.) to the various types of slavery and freedom, and to our lives today.

 

Shavuot: The unit recalls the knowledge acquired about Sfirat HaOmer, expounding on this knowledge through a “Historical Tour” along the TaL AM timeline of historical events which took place during Sfirat haOmer and their implications on our lives today.

 

In preparation for Shavuot, the students learn the Book of Ruth through activating the skill of reading between the lines, and engaging with the question “Why do we read the Book of Ruth during Shavuot?”, grounding the answers in the Biblical text. The unit closes with an examination of the holiday’s characteristics and their expression in the customs we practice today.

 

Yom haAtzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim: The unit opens with the events that transpired in Eretz Israel and in the world prior to the establishment of the State of Israel. The guided book haTalit Shel Saba tells the story of Grandpa Chaim, a Holocaust survivor who succeeded in journeying to Israel, emphasizing the imperative Zachor (Remember). The unit focuses on the flag – what it is, what the various types of flags are, and what they represent and the connection between the Talit and the flag of Israel. A wide selection of projects created by the students of the Virtual Class enables the children to learn how to prepare their own creative story about a flag of their choice using divergent thinking. They also learn what a limerick is, and how to write their own limerick and create their own flag.

 

Tefila & Parashat haShavua:

Parashot: 5 units – Bereshit, Shmot, VaYikra, BeMidbar, Dvarim.

haTfila baKita haPeila: 1 unit.

The students recap the content of the parashot through memory retrieval of factual knowledge. They learn how to independently write a Dvar Torah on a central idea in each parasha, which they can present to their families at home, implementing 6 stages: 1. Reviewing the content of the parasha through games and identifying key words; 2. Focusing on one verse and thinking about a main question/idea; 3. Studying a midrash or halacha written by Chazal and linked to the question/idea; 4. Examining the idea through contemporary literature or information; 5. Exploring the topic through divergent thinking using Thinking Hats and Action Gloves; 6. Creative writing of a Dvar Torah using key words.

 

Torah:

Sefer Shemot: 4 units

HaAvdut BeMitzrayim (Chapters 1-5), Esser HaMakot (Chapters 6-11), Yetziat Mitzrayim (Chapters 12-17), Mattan Torah (Chapters 18-24).

 

TaL AM 5 is organized in four discipline-based tracks, aligned to reinforce the development of learning, thinking and language skills. The brain-based design of the material and the congruence and alignment of its content and skills contribute to the acceleration of the learning process.

 

TaL AM 5 is comprised of the following materials:

 

For Students – Workbooks and CDs for acquisition, mastery, and creativity, and formative and summative assessment.

 

For Teachers – User-friendly manuals, a planner, formative and summative evaluation tools for content and skills, as well as PDF of the TaL AM materials: workbooks, guided readers and library books.

 

For the Classroom – Interactive posters, flashcards, games, library books for reading reinforcement and enrichment,

CDs and CD-ROMs.

 

For Parents – An overview of the content and skills of TaL AM 5, information letters updating parents of materials and learning experiences.

 

For the school – The Yearly Portfolio – a tool documenting the students’ achievements in content and communication skills (reading, writing and speaking). The portfolio will assist teachers and educational leadership in planning memory activation and continuing to develop the students’ knowledge and abilities in a deliberate, coordinated and inter-connected way from year to year.

 


What Is TaL AM?

TaL AM is a unique curriculum of Hebrew Language Arts and Jewish Studies for students in Grades 1 to 5.

 

The program was created with the mission of building a Hebrew and Heritage curriculum in a unifying language and unique voices, to develop the learners’ Jewish knowledge and identity, and to implement the curriculum through state-of-the-art professional development for their educators.

 

Based on years of research on the principles of language development and learning patterns, for over a few decades, the curriculum has been nurturing generations of Jewish children around the world who are literate in the Hebrew language, and equipped with the knowledge, skills and commitment they need to live vibrant Jewish lives.
Bringing the benefits of TaL AM to your students has never been easier!

 

TaL AM offers all the student and teacher materials that you’ll need to bring the program into your classrooms and homes, including workbooks, audio CDs, games on CDs and instructional manuals as well as library books and books-on-CD.

 

In order to ensure successful implementation of the programs, we regularly host teacher training institutes at various locations around the world, where the architects of the program work closely with teachers to develop mastery of the curriculum and its innovative brain-based learning methodology.

 

All schools wanting to launch the TaL AM program must first have their teachers participate in our training institutes.

 

Who uses TaL AM?

Every year, a growing number of students enjoy the benefits of the TaL AM curriculum. The program is currently being implemented in 347 schools around the world, enriching over 30,580 students in 38 different countries in Canada, the United States, Europe, South Africa, South America, Australia and Asia.

 

Adaptability

TaL AM is sensitive to the variety of Jewish schools, lending itself to guided adaptations to:

  • the Ideology and special ethos of the school;
  • the school’s time allocation for Hebrew and Jewish Studies;
  • the teacher’s style, knowledge and instructional skills;
  • the Jewish calendar;
  • the kindergarten curriculum.